Tuesday, July 6, 2010


"…throughout my work I try to avoid treating past philosophers as mere specimens on display in some intellectual museum full of quaint exhibits of thankfully outmoded world views. The basic motivation of philosophy, namely, the search for wisdom and truths by which we might lead worthwhile lives, will never become a thing of the past until intelligent life itself ceases to be a feature of this universe. And given that basic motivation, the issues and problems of philosophy are bound to remain more or less constant…there is an intrinsic value in constantly reexamining the thought of our predecessors without assuming like the reactionary that past ages had a better handle on reality than we have and without assuming like the uncritical modernist that humanity is incessantly progressing towards some higher understanding."
— Richard P Hayes, Dingāga on the Interpretation of Signs.